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Thread: Genocide

  1. #61
    Pope Carlo l K6BSO's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K7SGJ View Post
    I'll tell ya, any of you can call it what you want. I realize that certain topics hit closer to home than others, and sometimes they are more passionate about a cause or situation. I get it. That's why I personally don't care what you call it. All in all, it is a very dangerous and difficult situation. One that requires more than "one size fits all" restrictions that will have a negative effect on legitimate users.

    But like most every government involvement into drug interdiction, the ones that end up paying the price will be the legitimate users of opioids. People like me.

    […]
    Or like my XXYL, chronic pain that has only responded to the opioid Suboxone. She has to jump through all those same hoops as you do, Eddie.

    So, I don't care what you call it, it just needs to be addressed carefully and responsibly.
    And calling opioid addiction "genocide" is being neither careful or responsible.
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  2. #62
    "Island Bartender" KG4CGC's Avatar
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    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/17/h...companies.html

    At a time when the United States is in the grip of an opioid epidemic, many insurers are limiting access to pain medications that carry a lower risk of addiction or dependence, even as they provide comparatively easy access to generic opioid medications.The reason, experts say: Opioid drugs are generally cheap while safer alternatives are often more expensive.Drugmakers, pharmaceutical distributors, pharmacies and doctors have come under intense scrutiny in recent years, but the role that insurers — and the pharmacy benefit managers that run their drug plans — have played in the opioid crisis has received less attention.
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  3. #63
    Volcano Tamer n2ize's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KG4CGC View Post
    Nope. He's just going to arrest more users and lock them up for longer.
    Thats about the extent of it. Other than an uptick in the prison population and/or arrest numbers in some areas nothing will change. If anything the opioids will be more plentiful.
    I keep my 2 feet on the ground, and my head in the twilight zone.

  4. #64
    Volcano Tamer n2ize's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K6BSO View Post
    Or like my XXYL, chronic pain that has only responded to the opioid Suboxone. She has to jump through all those same hoops as you do, Eddie.



    And calling opioid addiction "genocide" is being neither careful or responsible.
    There is a long time myth that opioid addict actually want to commit suicide or are committing a "slow suicide". I don't know how that myth got started but many doctors and addiction counselors have stated it is a false characterization void of any truth.
    I keep my 2 feet on the ground, and my head in the twilight zone.

  5. #65
    Master Navigator koØm's Avatar
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    THE DRUG INDUSTRY’S TRIUMPH OVER THE DEA



    DEA_topper-extend.jpg

    In April 2016, at the height of the deadliest drug epidemic in U.S. history, Congress effectively stripped the Drug Enforcement Administration of its most potent weapon against large drug companies suspected of spilling prescription narcotics onto the nation’s streets.

    By then, the opioid war had claimed 200,000 lives, more than three times the number of U.S. military deaths in the Vietnam War. Overdose deaths continue to rise. There is no end in sight.

    A handful of members of Congress, allied with the nation’s major drug distributors, prevailed upon the DEA and the Justice Department to agree to a more industry-friendly law, undermining efforts to stanch the flow of pain pills, according to an investigation by The Washington Post and “60 Minutes.” The DEA had opposed the effort for years.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...=.2af16c80a1c5

  6. #66
    Volcano Tamer n2ize's Avatar
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    There was always an "opioid epidemic". It just didn't make the news until recently when opioid became popular among predominantly white middle and upper middle class young adults. To make matters worst many of of these people use opioid as if they were smoking weed or guzzling booze. They underestimate how powerful opiates are and they also underestimate the extremely high potential for physical addiction. Where as in the old days it often took a good while for a person to develop a strong opioid habit many of these kids today are developing a heavy habit in a matter of a couple weeks.

    Another problem is that when lawmakers react to these situations their first step often involves restricting access to people who legitimately need these drugs for legitimate reasons. The best solution to this problem as I see it is a more honest and straightforward approach to drug education without the stereotypical slogans and scaremongering, combined with ready on demand access to drug treatment and recovery programs. This is another place where lawmakers fail miserably at they all to often limit funding that ccould go to useful things like drug education and drug treatment.

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