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Thread: All Dutch trains run on green energy now.

  1. #21
    Administrator N8YX's Avatar
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    As far as railroads being suburban and rural people movers goes: If I had a dollar for every foot of track which has been torn out since the federal government embarked on their big highway building campaigns, I'd be a very rich man.

    That in a nutshell is what killed the railroad as a people mover in the less densely populated areas of the country.

    Given the current emission regulations in place for diesel locomotives, it makes zero sense to examine anything but electricity as a locomotion power source. But that depends on WHY alternatives are being considered, not just the alternatives themselves. Is there a sufficient cost benefit per unit ton of fuel burned that railroads are seriously considering coal as a power source?
    "Everyone wants to be an AM Gangsta until it's time to start doing AM Gangsta shit."

  2. #22
    Master Navigator HUGH's Avatar
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    Trains in the Nether lands appear to run on time as well. Sadly, in the UK, the individual lines have been privatised making fares expensive and routes inflexible. Delays are always blamed on the weather or anything other than the company running the service.

    Britain is an island (yes, I know) with an extensive coastline and the Severn Estuary, and hence the South Wales coast, has an average tidal range of 26 feet. Some years ago the idea was raised of tidal lagoons to allow electricity generation but, thanks largely to the ineptitude of decision-making politicians, nothing happened. Suddenly this year, as a response to the regular closing of coal-fired power stations, it is likely that tidal lagoons will be created off the South Wales coast at Cardiff Bay and Swansea Bay.

    This is something I'm in total agreement with rather than building wind farms, which are unreliable and poor value for money.

    Cardiff.jpg

    Swansea.jpg

    Local fishermen are not happy but it's likely that a lagoon could be a safe breeding area for fish and seabirds different to those encountered at present.

  3. #23
    Volcano Tamer n2ize's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by N8YX View Post
    As far as railroads being suburban and rural people movers goes: If I had a dollar for every foot of track which has been torn out since the federal government embarked on their big highway building campaigns, I'd be a very rich man.

    That in a nutshell is what killed the railroad as a people mover in the less densely populated areas of the country.

    Given the current emission regulations in place for diesel locomotives, it makes zero sense to examine anything but electricity as a locomotion power source. But that depends on WHY alternatives are being considered, not just the alternatives themselves. Is there a sufficient cost benefit per unit ton of fuel burned that railroads are seriously considering coal as a power source?
    I don't know of any US based railways that are considering using coal. Round here most everything is electric except for a few diesel trains that might run on some of the few remaining miles of trackage that are still not electrified. In NYC subways diesels are only used to pull work trains in event electric power is down in an area for one reason or another. On the main commuter rail lines diesel use has declined considerably over the last decade or two as just about all trackage is now electrified. The New Haven line operates via a high voltage overhead catenary system and the Hudson and Harlem lines use a standard 600 VDC 3rd rail distribution system.
    I keep my 2 feet on the ground, and my head in the twilight zone.

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