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Thread: The 'What Are You Reading?' Thread

  1. #171
    Istanbul Expert N2NH's Avatar
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    Eighty Days: Nellie Bly and Elizabeth Bisland's History-Making Race Around the World by Matthew Goodman

    On November 14, 1889, Nellie Bly, the crusading young female reporter for Joseph Pulitzer's "World" newspaper, left New York City by steamship on a quest to break the record for the fastest trip around the world. Also departing from New York that day--and heading in the opposite direction by train--was a young journalist from "The Cosmopolitan" magazine, Elizabeth Bisland. Each woman was determined to outdo Jules Verne's fictional hero Phileas Fogg and circle the globe in less than eighty days. The dramatic race that ensued would span twenty-eight thousand miles, captivate the nation, and change both competitors' lives forever. The two women were a study in contrasts. Nellie Bly was a scrappy, hard-driving, ambitious reporter from Pennsylvania coal country who sought out the most sensational news stories, often going undercover to expose social injustice. Genteel and elegant, Elizabeth Bisland had been born into an aristocratic Southern family, preferred novels and poetry to newspapers, and was widely referred to as the most beautiful woman in metropolitan journalism. Both women, though, were talented writers who had carved out successful careers in the hypercompetitive, male-dominated world of big-city newspapers. "Eighty Days" brings these trailblazing women to life as they race against time and each other, unaided and alone, ever aware that the slightest delay could mean the difference between victory and defeat...
    Musical Interlude in which Doris gets her oats.

    Last edited by N2NH; 01-01-2015 at 07:17 AM.
    “The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use the words."
    --Philip K. Dick

  2. #172
    Istanbul Expert N2NH's Avatar
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    In a Glass Darkly by Agatha Christie.

    The narrator is startled by a vision in his mirror: He sees a man with a scarred neck strangling a beautiful blonde. He later meets the woman in his vision, Sylvia, and notes her fiancé's scarred neck. He tells her of his premonition, and the engagement is broken off. But is that all there is to it?
    “The basic tool for the manipulation of reality is the manipulation of words. If you can control the meaning of words, you can control the people who must use the words."
    --Philip K. Dick

  3. #173
    Master Navigator KC2KFC's Avatar
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    I am currently reading "The Proud Tower - A Portrait of the World Before the War 1890-1914" by Barbara Tuchman. A fascinating read about the decade and a half before that fateful August in 1914.
    “The great danger in movements to the Left is that the protagonists of the movement are so wrapped up with the end that the means becomes secondary.”
    -John F. Kennedy

  4. #174
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    "Blowing the Bloody Doors Off and Other Lessons in Life" by Michael Caine.
    Last edited by KC2KFC; 04-07-2019 at 04:37 PM. Reason: Spelling error.
    “The great danger in movements to the Left is that the protagonists of the movement are so wrapped up with the end that the means becomes secondary.”
    -John F. Kennedy

  5. #175
    Master Navigator KC2KFC's Avatar
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    "Agatha Christie an Autobiography"
    “The great danger in movements to the Left is that the protagonists of the movement are so wrapped up with the end that the means becomes secondary.”
    -John F. Kennedy

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